SamosFor the past few months, a monk seal has been hanging out on various beaches at the island of Samos, North Aegean Sea. Today the monk seal, aka Argyro, was seen lying on a sunbed!
Link to marine conservation organistion Archipelagos here:http://archipelago.gr/en/kentriki-selida-archipelagos/

Samos

For the past few months, a monk seal has been hanging out on various beaches at the island of Samos, North Aegean Sea. Today the monk seal, aka Argyro, was seen lying on a sunbed!

Link to marine conservation organistion Archipelagos here:
http://archipelago.gr/en/kentriki-selida-archipelagos/

Athens"Δεν υπάρχει τριαντάφυλλο χωρίς αγκάθια. Πολλά αγκάθια όμως είναι χωρίς τριαντάφυλλο.”(Σοπενχάουερ)
“No rose without a thorn but many a thorn without a rose.”
(Schopenhauer)

Athens

"Δεν υπάρχει τριαντάφυλλο χωρίς αγκάθια. 

Πολλά αγκάθια όμως είναι χωρίς τριαντάφυλλο.”
(Σοπενχάουερ)

“No rose without a thorn but many a thorn without a rose.”

(Schopenhauer)

Santorini
Photo by Anna Shulte
www.santorinivacationphotography.com

Santorini

Photo by Anna Shulte

www.santorinivacationphotography.com

Behind a Centuries-Old International Feud Over Marbles

"All of this marble is in London," says Dimitrios Pandermalis, reluctantly gesturing to an entire wall of plaster copies of art that used to be on the Parthenon.

The president of the Acropolis Museum is clearly tired of rehashing to another foreign journalist the 200-year-old fight between Greece and the United Kingdom. But he knows and believes the script entirely: “It’s a crime,” the elder curator tells me in the glass-walled museum at the foot of the ancient citadel. “It’s important to have the originals here. It’s one unit.”

That so-called crime, as most Greeks still refer to it, was when from 1801 and 1805 the British ambassador to the Ottoman Empire detached, cut, crowbarred, and hauled half of the surviving marble art from the Parthenon back to his residence in London. Since the Ottomans ruled Athens at the time—and for around 350 years before—he supposedly got permission from the proper authorities to have at it. They just so happened to have not been Greek. In financial trouble, the ambassador, named Lord Elgin, finally sold the pieces to the British government in 1816. They were then transferred to the British Museum, and have been there ever since.

Greek Archaeology Site Sparks Intense Interest

Archaeologists excavating a large burial mound in northern Greece that has captivated the public’s imagination have asked politicians and others seeking guided tours of the site to leave them in peace.

The Culture Ministry appealed Thursday for “understanding” while the Amphipolis excavation proceeds.

The partially uncovered tomb from the end of Greek warrior-king Alexander the Great’s reign, which was found inside the mound, has sparked intense media interest amid wild speculation that it may contain rich treasures or the bones of an ancient celebrity.

Alexander inherited the throne of Macedonia, in northern Greece, from where he set off to conquer a vast empire reaching India. He died in 323 B.C. at age 33 and was buried in Egypt — although the precise location of his grave is one of the enduring mysteries of archaeology.

Tilos
Photo by Linda Pozzoli

Tilos

Photo by Linda Pozzoli

Tourist arrivals in June increase 13.7 pct, bringing significant rise in receipts

After a temporary slowdown in May, Greece’s travel receipts rebounded strongly in June, shooting up by 16.3 percent from 0.8 percent in May, according to the Bank of Greece (BoG).

In absolute figures, travel receipts in June reached 1.99 billion euros from 1.71 billion last year. Travel payments also rose by 12.1 percent to 203 million in May. As a result, the travel surplus surged 16.7 percent to 1.78 billion from 1.53 billion last year.

The rebound in travel receipts reflects a 13.7 percent increase in international tourist arrivals and a moderate rise of 2.5 percent in travel spending per trip. Arrivals reached 2.7 million in June from 2.37 million last year.

The highest rise in arrivals was recorded by tourists from the UK (+41.2 percent), France (+16.8 percent) and Germany (+12.2 percent).

Syros - The oldest and tallest Lighthouse in Greece - from the air

Athens. 1945
Photo by Dmitri Kessel

Athens. 1945

Photo by Dmitri Kessel

note: loading more posts will reset any filters applied
More